Word Hunters – The Lost Hunters by Nick Earls and Terry Whidborne reviewed by Jill Smith

Word Hunters – The Lost Hunters by Nick Earls and Terry Whidborne reviewed by Jill Smith.

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Word Hunters – The Curious Dictionary by Nick Earls and Terry Whidborne reviewed by Jill Smith

Word Hunters – The Curious Dictionary by Nick Earls and Terry Whidborne reviewed by Jill Smith.

Readers Inform. Writers Take Note.

Readers Inform. Writers Take Note..

The Dream Library

The Dream Library.

This is my idea of Heaven – books, books, everywhere!

Pitching Myself at the Edge of History

Pitching Myself at the Edge of History.

Book coasters

This is the third book in the continuing saga of the Duffy and McIntosh families shared curse.  The blurb describes this as a stunning conclusion to the trilogy although I’m certain that this tale will continue for many more tomes.

Peter models his work on the mass-market success format of Wilbur Smith.  His canvass is the Queensland outback as a new frontier colony emerges from savage beginnings to become a settled civilized land.  The characters are rich and diverse and the readers longing to know what becomes of each of the already well known occupants of Peters’ imagination drives the rapid devouring of the solid volume.

Michael Duffy has lived a rugged life in exile in America after partaking in grizzly wars.  He returns a mercenary to Australia to discover his son Patrick has been groomed by the McIntosh matriarch Enid McIntosh to take over the family business and disinherit…

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Book coasters

‘Shadow of the Osprey’ is a must read follow on from ‘Cry of the Curlew’.  The family conflict between the Duffy and McIntosh families continues to follow the burgeoning growth of the Australian nation.  The savagery of this new frontier is accompanied by espionage and diplomatic games played on the chessboard of a harsh unforgiving landscape.

As those who’ve already read and enjoyed ‘Cry of the Curlew’ will gladly agree, this book follows the growth of the characters.  In many ways, the harsh reality of the world Peter has created for them, has made them ‘grow up.’

Enid McIntosh continues to hold her bitterness at her husband Douglas and eldest son Angus untimely deaths, causing an erosion of her control of the family business to Granville White, her nephew and her daughter Fiona’s husband.  Her deep distrust of the young man thirsting for power is ignited into a flame of…

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